Posts tagged ‘Lego Serious Play’

October 3, 2013

LSP Facilitator Training in Italy!

LEGO SERIOUS PLAY

LEGO SERIOUS PLAY

For the first time, the LEGO SERIOUS PLAY facilitator training lands in Italy. The training will be held by Robert Rasmussen on 25-28 March 2014 and the location is Milano, next to Loreto Tube Station. To get the information Pack or to know more, please, get in touch!

The 4 days’ training will introduce participants to the secrets and magic of LSP. The Objectives of the course are the following:

  • 1)  To experience and learn the LEGO SERIOUS PLAY methodology and its standard applications, Real Time Strategy for the Enterprise and Real Time Strategy for the Team 
    • a)  Deeper insight into the Core Process and the Seven Application Techniques
    • b)  An understanding of the relationship between the methodology and the standard applications
    • c)  Experience workshops as end-user participant 
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June 7, 2013

Jamming with LEGO SERIOUS PLAY: the 5 variables of Workshop Design

LSP @ GovJam

LSP @ GovJam

What if I apply LEGO SERIOUS PLAY to a Jam?

I should not ask myself such questions, because when I ask myself this, I want to find out the answer. So, my latest experiment was applying LSP to a GovJam. For those who are unfamiliar with the Jam concept, a Gov or Service Jam is a global event, taking place simultaneously all around the world for 48 hours, where participants, called jammers, are called to design a service or a product on a common secret theme, which is revealed just at the beginning of the Jam. The name Jam is taken by music: in a jam session musicians improvise on a common theme and make music together. The idea in a Jam of ideas, is the same: let people improvise and jam with their ideas to make new ideas together.
In a GovJam, the goal is to design a service aimed at the local public administration. Knowing how LSP can be flexible and how helpful it is when it comes to define a common topic and for team building, I thought it could be an exciting challenge to imagine and design a LEGO SERIOUS PLAY workshop to enhance creativity and let people to jam ideas with bricks.

This turned out to be an exciting designing exercise which has been demanding but rewarding as well. Designing an LSP workshop for a Jam, revealed a number of key differences with the design of a ‘traditional’ workshops and this challenge lead to a dynamic, exciting and challenging workshop management. Thanks to the experience, I have had kind of a guerilla training in managing the unexpected and I have learnt a number of useful issues which will be useful for future workshop design.
So, I have identified 5 variables that should be taken into consideration when designing a workshop in any other situation where nothing is given and everything is improvised and based on the play-do-play-do mantra.

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April 26, 2013

Organisations as organisms: consciousness and wellness

Organisations as organisms: consciousness and wellness

Organisations as organisms

A large extend of organisational theory considered organisations from a mechanistic and traditional view. However, organisations can be seen much more like living biological organism. The etymology of the two words, organisations and organisms suggests that the two terms share something much more significant that needs to be considered and looked at: they both share their greek origin, ὄργανον – organon, “instrument, implement, tool, organ of sense or apprehension” but the word has been traced to descend by the Proto-Indo-European *werǵ- (“work, to make”).
The history of the term well reflects the shift from the original biological meaning to the much more social nature of contemporary meaning: organisation, according to the English Oxford Dictionary, appeared in 14th century in French from Latin and originally it referred to anything  related to a living being. Organisation referred to the development or coordination of parts in order to carry out vital functions. From its first appearance in 1425 when the Grand Chirurgie was published and recorded the term until late 18th century, the term organisation had a specific biologic connotation. But at the end of the 18th century a new meaning come to use, and organisation started referring to “the condition of being organised; systematic ordering or arrangement; specifically the way in which particular activities or institutions are organised.” In 1790 E. Burke wrote the Reflections on the Revolution in France where he explicitly stated that society was supposed to be managed as a living organism. This passage is considered as the first evidence of the shift from the biological into the sociological realm of the term organisation.

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April 12, 2013

The LEGO SERIOUS PLAY Facilitators’ meeting

Hands on! LSP Faciitators in an LSP workshop! [Photo by Lucio Margulis]

Hands on! LSP Facilitators in an LSP workshop! [Photo by Lucio Margulis]

Every year, when April comes, LSP facilitators know that a great inspiring event is in the air. It’s the annual LEGO SERIOUS PLAY facilitators’ meeting, the most exciting event for those who practice and experience the power of LEGO bricks as a Facilitation tool. Every year an increasing number of facilitators gather in Billund, Denmark, the place where LEGO was born in 1934.

LSP is a tool which has been developed at the end of the ’90s at IMD in Switzerland based on the studies of Johan Roos and Bart Victor who introduced the “serious play” concept and process as a way to enable managers to describe, create and challenge the views of their business. The Serious Play approach was then further developed and brought into LEGO SERIOUS PLAY by Robert Rasmussen, who worked at LEGO at that time, and who is the main architect of the LSP methodology and one of the most inspiring and LSP enthusiast.

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April 6, 2013

Put knowledge into action and build organisational wisdom: LSP and DIKW

Ackoff's DIKW Pyramid [Source: http://raws.adc.rmit.edu.au/~s3308292/blog2/?tag=integrated-media-2

DIKW Pyramid (Ackoff)

The importance of organisations’ relationship capital lies in the quality of the relations established by the members of an organisation, and in organisations’ capacity to turn a group of individuals into a functional team.
Such a social and relational capital can be the driver for the creation of organisational wisdom . Organisations have long focused on the skill base and on the accumulation of internal know-hows, improving and encouraging people to increase their knowledge base, as if by increasing the individuals knowledge could spontaneously have a massive impact on the whole organisation. An increase in the know-how is essential for an organisation, however, for such a know-how to become an organisational asset, rather than to remain an individual (human resource related) skill, more efforts are needed.
If the relational capital is not adequate and constructive, knowledge of an individual remains an individual personal asset rather than becoming part of a collective and organisational environment.
To capitalise on the learning practices that have pervaded organisations in the past decade, knowledge needs to be put into action. Know-hows need to turn into know-whys.

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